Fake News and Digital Citizenship

I was working with an amazing group of teachers for a class at University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Policy.

At the time, we had just arrived at news being altered or appearing fake January 2017. Words seemed to not mean what the people interviewing said that they meant, and we were all a little confused. I developed this unit for class and shared it with them.  I hope people find it useful. Below is the lesson I presented to adults, with warnings and all sites cited. Many of these sites were discovered while participating in the University of Nebraska-Omaha Library Endorsement Program or while working for Lincoln Public Schools as a Librarian.  I also found some of these great gems through other avenues of discovery.  WARNING: Limit new discoveries to fifteen minutes, or you will forget what you went to look for easily. Enjoy!

Deanne Hyde Boilesen

 

Digital Citizenship:  Digital Citizenship or Fake News: Picking a Path

We have all heard that we need to leave a good ecological footprint, but we are just now discovering what it means to leave a digital footprint.  Employers tell us to make sure our actions online are professional and to this end we must help our students understand the changing times and that pictures snapchatted can and will last forever.  I am going to give you some fun materials to help promote digital citizenship in your classrooms while you think about what are your digital policies?  A Fair(y) Tale use is recommended for everyone, but many of these can be tailored for your age group.

Digital media is changing everyday and so are the rules of what is acceptable for posting, sharing, and viewing in some situations.  Our country is behind on the rules of engagement.  There was a think tank by the last administration, with pod casts asking for people to help the United States with ideas about policy.  I am not finding those today.  Net Neutrality is also a big force in trying to understand who has access and why?  I am suggesting a video here for your benefit, but editing or discussing it with students instead of watching it with them. What was once only privacy issues and academic property has morphed into who can have access to what with filters being applied and even the threat of censorship as in other countries.  Students must become activists in their own learning and this begins with responsibility through teacher modeling.

Questions while exploring for your students:

Who can contribute to the internet?  Who is watching and monitoring what is going on the internet?  How can we help our students be good stewards of their presence?  Can they distinguish between good sites and bad sites? The information provided has links where I would give students directions to go to a website and interact with the lesson.  For Fair Use, we are evaluating if we can reuse the material.  For Digital Citizenship, what does it mean to belong to our digital community and what are the rules?  For Fake News, we discuss how could people believe this material, what are ways we could have been fooled? All of these lead to critical analysis and toward research standards. This where policy is beginning and finding ways to defend and promote ideas, use, and filtering on the internet.

Not all schools have internet policies other than no porn, nothing “bad”, and they watch with web monitoring.  Some schools, like LPS, have the internet policy of a group of educators (loosely defined) who will say where students can and cannot go.  If other educators would like to use a restricted site, then they may fill out a form and wait for the site to be vetted.  LPS went from a “use what works” to “We vet everything” in one year with the advent of their beginning to use one to one devices. (Video and music downloads take too much space on the servers and take up bandwidth, thus teacher were given alternate to Youtube sites and ways of sharing material while students are supposed to be not allowed to Youtube and Netflicks.) Teacher were going to places and inviting viruses because they were “getting something quick” instead of using resources from the video library that the district pays for every year.  After a site is vetted, it is added to a list of acceptable places and teachers can choose from those sites. This list of approved sites is expected to grow after those vetting catch up to the sites already being used.  Is this good policy or bad?

Our Discussion:     A Guide

Here comes the fun.  Pick ONE TOPIC and have fun with looking at sources.  Comment on how you might use sources or why you found it valuable to helping students learn about cyberspace?  If you find something horrible, let me know too.  I have spent time reacquainting myself with these sites, but something could have changed overnight.  When students have a good time looking at information and can play, then they often remember the information.  Having fun also makes for less whiny students, no whine in my classroom!  Think about how you would approach a technology group to advocate for a certain site. Does vetting work for your teaching style or should you be trusted to find your own material? Having a large selection of sites is another option, would this help your teaching style?  Think about the pros and cons for finding websites that support your teaching goals.

Below you are given a few options within each topic.  Some of these initial sites have several ideas.  The last link has the “overload” page with a large number of connected sites you could look at for your title.  Students often feel this way as they are doing research. They start with a few choices and then it seems too many come up. Databases are often used in research to limit the number of articles, but when the subject is not part of the databases, can the student go to Google, Dogpile, or Bing?  In some classrooms, the answer is, “No.”  How does this effect your thoughts on a policy of limited choices?

Should we be able to share anything and keep content our own or be limited in what we can access across the internet (grade depending)?

Choose Digital Citizenship or Fake News. How are policy shapers helping us by limits? Is this hurting our critical thinking? If you can ask Siri for the answer, that is not research or a good question of inquiry. How do you feel about sharing information in the internet?  Should all information be available without cost if properly cited?  Do your students know about creative commons?

Pick one of the Policy papers to read and think about how we are discussing these issues as lawyers instead of just the language of education.  There are many other papers collected on this website from all over if you prefer another instead of the two I have chosen. How can you help in your building begin the discussion of students using information correctly and sharing quality information with others?

Net Neutrality is the last stop on the journey.  John Oliver made some comments, they were noticed, and policy was changed.  This article has the original clip and then discusses the aftermath and the changes that were made or not made to the policy.

Your mission: Answer questions that excite you and ask questions that we can answer or point toward more questions. 

 

  1. START HERE

All should watch this one, because it is fun.

This is a fun way to help remind and introduce Copy right law and fair use.  Be mindful that the images can come quickly and may make some audience members ill. DO not watch in a moving vehicle.

http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2007/03/fairy-use-tale

Does this change the way you think about creating new projects for students as research?  Can an alternate approach to presentation really help students learn?

Not that you need it, but check out the CRAP Test for websites.  Older students think this worksheet is just great.  Some people without a sense of humor may not like it. We all need a laugh.

https://libraries.mercer.edu/research-tools-help/citation-tools-help/images/PrintableCRAPtest.pdf

There are many versions out there, but this one also has a small section at the end that reminds students about domain suffixes.  One should also follow the money with evaluating, but that is another conversation you do not need to worry about here.

  1. Choose your adventure: NOW
  2. Digital Citizenship. Explore links on the pages. Check out a few links.

On this page, follow the links to other lessons specific to that topic.

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=242

Our district approves of these based on age appropriate.

https://www.commonsense.org/education/student-interactives

Different site with more games.

http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/Resources.html

ScoopIT! Has some valuable articles

http://www.scoop.it/t/digital-citizenship-in-schools

Halfway down this page is Digital Citizenship overload!  (Lots of other amazing sites too.)

http://www.sldirectory.com/libsf/resf/techplans.html#safety

Questions:

Which site did you prefer? Does vetting work for your teaching style or should you be trusted to find your own material? Having a large selection of sites is another option, would this help your teaching style?  Write about the pros and cons for finding websites that support your teaching goals.

Can you approach a committee with why your site should be allowed? How are policy shapers helping us by adding limits?  Are they hurting our critical thinking? How do you feel about sharing information in the internet?  Should all information be available without cost if properly cited?

  1. Or will you go this way?
  2. Fake News Choose a few links

A few lesson plans

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/18/tech/how-to-spot-fake-misleading-news-trnd/index.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fcnn_tech+%28RSS%3A+CNN+-+Technology%29

 

One way to help with fake news is to read articles that are fake and talk about them.  You can get copies by putting in fake news.  Another project is to have students change information on Wikipeda.  The problem is that after several classes do it, then it blocks you entire ip address from being able to mess with or access wikipeda for at least a couple of days.  Teachers do this activity at Southeast High School.

 

Fake news lesson plans (These are everywhere, but most are newer and helpful).

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/lessons_plans/lesson-plan-how-to-teach-your-students-about-fake-news/

This has some great imbedded videos, you could take and make your own or just show the videos and discuss.

https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/02/skills-and-strategies-fake-news-vs-real-news-determining-the-reliability-of-sources/?_r=0

Fake news overload: warning this leads to many, many sites.

http://www.sldirectory.com/libsf/resf/fakenews.html#top

Questions: Which site did you prefer? Does vetting work for your teaching style or should you be trusted to find your own material? Having a large selection of sites is another option, would this help your teaching style?  Write about the pros and cons for finding websites that support your teaching goals.

Can you approach a committee with why your site should be allowed? How are policy shapers helping us by limits or hurting our critical thinking? How do you feel about sharing information in the internet?  Should all information be available without cost if properly cited?

 

  1. All together now! Pick one.

POLICY

Do not spend a great deal of time here.  These are just a few pieces in the puzzle that is untangling.  There are many other sites and links to follow if interested, I just do not want people overwhelmed. If you start down the path of digital curation, spend only ten minutes a day finding information.  Otherwise, just like facebook, you will waste large amounts of time going nowhere and forget what you were originally looking for in the first place.  Proceed with caution and wakeful awareness as to your purpose.  Have fun.

Cyberlaw at Stanford has many links they have curated for digital law.  It is a great place to start and then proceed outward.

 

Digital piracy debunked: a short note on digital threats and intermediary liability

http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/files/publication/files/Internet%20Policy%20Review%20-%20Digital%20piracy%20debunked-%20a%20short%20note%20on%20digital%20threats%20and%20intermediary%20liability%20-%202016-03-23.pdf

Human Rights and Cybersecurity Due Diligence: A Comparative Study

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers2.cfm?abstract_id=2796634

This just in Jan31, Trump and another order or not?

https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/31/trumps-draft-cybersecurity-order-raises-policy-questions/

Which policies does he intend to follow or not, implications for us all, keep watching!

 

 

Question: How can you help in your building begin the discussion of students using information correctly and sharing quality information with others? What policies does you building have for technology with one to one devices? Is there something that has worked very well in your building, classroom that you can share?

 

  1. LAST Part you need to do!

Net Neutrality with John Oliver Teachers need to have fun too!

https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-02-26/how-john-oliver-transformed-the-net-neutrality-debate-once-and-for-all

This post includes the original clip.  No, he is not a dingo. Make sure you see original clip, not with students, although many in higher levels have already seen it.  Nice to have the follow up of how his comments did change the policy.

Feel free to answer any questions that excite you or pose your own:

What kinds of policies about digital citizenship do you want to see in your classroom and in your school?  How can fake news be used to help with understanding research, should there be a policy about fake news?  What is considered fake and what is satire? Do either have a place in our society?

Can teachers be relied upon to find useful resources or should schools develop policy about what can and cannot be used by school in the digital age?  Is there a remedy for teachers?

What policies might be adopted in our schools to help students gain access to the internet equally or fairly?

 

The internet can be an amazing place with lots of information to share, but just as you would not drop your kid off at the mall when they are four by themselves, students need some training and some guidance during research to help them make good discussions about reliable sources, knowing how the game of fake news and their responsibility as patrons of the internet will help everyone in the future.

 

Thank you for coming on this fun adventure!

Your humble Cybrarian.

 

Further Resources : Just for fun.  Here are some prizes!

Teachers only

This is fun to share with older readers and to possibly give to teachers.  Just a thinking point about their content online.

Are you Particular, Promiscuous, or Private?

http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2016/04/roy-tennant-digital-libraries/are-you-particular-promiscuous-or-private/

Digital shift is also a great place for librarians and digital seekers to get more information on libraries, digital curation, and all things information.

Teacher reading only.  The dry notion of digital citizenship, but this magazine is one to follow on twitter and read their offerings about tech and education.

https://edtechdigest.wordpress.com/2016/06/15/what-is-digital-citizenship/

Daring Librarian offers useful tech and book information.   They tweet and have a wiki.  This is a link to the wki example.

http://thedaringlibrarian.wikispaces.com/

Advocacy for libraries

Scoop is a free site where you can curate for your records or keep articles that you are interested. Digital curation is amazing so you do not lose them when you want to find them again.

http://www.scoop.it/t/promoting-our-school-libraries

Warning document overload! Lincoln Public Schools

http://www.sldirectory.com/libsf/resf/promote.html#top

Standards:

http://www.iste.org/standards/standards/standards-for-teachers

  1. Design and develop digital age learning experiences and assessments.
  2. Model digital age work and learning.
  3. Promote and model digital Citizenship and Responsibility.

Resources:

To evaluate Fair Use.  Not always helpful, but if you show as a demonstration, not bad.  When kids try it, it can go badly quickly. http://librarycopyright.net/resources/fairuse/

School Librarian Resource page with links for everything from research to all things librarian.  Warning, lots of links.  Found through Lincoln Public Schools. Many links for all subjects carefully maintained by a retired librarian.

http://www.sldirectory.com/index.html#top

 

Digital Resources:

Twitter:  I follow many libraries, national and international

I follow librarians and other technology teaching folks.

Tech Crunch   EdTech Higher Ed     multiple news agencies.  This has been a great way to connect with professional sites and then if I like the page, go to the full article, and save for later.

Some of these also show up in email and I can curate (keep elsewhere for later digitally).

Facebook, there are a few education sites, they seem to not show up as often.

Evernote and Scoopit!  are great.  I also love Kahoot!  and Socratic for quizzes and games.

 

 

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